Quantum Computing Quantum News

The quest for quantum-proof encryption just made a leap forward

August 3, 2020

The quest for quantum-proof encryption just made a leap forward

Instead of using traditional binary code, which represents information with 0s and 1s, they use quantum bits, or qubits. Even the National Security Agency, the US spy agency that has long sounded alarms over the threat posed by quantum computers, recently expressed confidence in lattice-based approaches. Although these problems are hard, they seem quite efficient in terms of time to generate keys, time to construct signatures, and also efficient in terms of memory. What NIST thinks is that lattice problems are really hard,” says Elena Kirshanova, a mathematician and cryptanalysis researcher at I.Kant Baltic Federal University in Russia. And so far a single approach to “post-quantum cryptography” accounts for the majority of the finalists: lattice-based cryptography. Last year Google famously boasted it had achieved “quantum supremacy” by finding a task a quantum computer could do that was essentially impossible for a classical computer. The unusual properties of qubits make quantum computers far more powerful for some kinds of calculations, including the mathematical problems that underpin much of modern encryption.

Article from MIT Technology Review.