Quantum Computing News

Weekend Lock-down Learning: Learn Quantum Computing in 2 days

April 3, 2020

You might be locked down but you are not locked up. You can go to plenty of places in your mind and learn many new skills, subjects and areas. All without leaving your home. So instead of feeling limited, why not learn the spooky science behind Quantum Computing?

Over the last few weeks we have reviewed a lot of books with still more to come and that is not mentioning all the online resources. So if you want to do something productive rather then tune into Netflix here are some ideas to get ahead of the curve (with this virus we are always talking about flattening the curve!).

Interactive Quantum Computing

Reading is great, but it can only take you so far. One of the best ways of learning is to “do it” and do it interactively. There are few courses that are as advanced or as smart as that provided by Brilliant. Its a fun way to learn and its backed by great companies like Microsoft and Google. You can sign-up and see how it works. Plus if you want to anything else mathematical its a fantastic platform to brush up on learning. And if not for you then it makes a perfect gift for the children in your household.

💡 Learn Quantum Computing with Brilliant

Learning can be fun if you learn interactively with courses designed by learning and subject experts. Courses from Brilliant are designed to help get the best out of your mind. They have courses on everything from basic maths to Quantum Computing. So if you really want to get to grips with the material – the best way is to interact with it.

Quantum Books

If you want the depth of understanding, nothing beats a textbook for helping you understand the intricacies of Quantum Computing. There are now some books that basically take you from very little background information to understanding some of the fundamentals of Quantum Computing such as Gate operations (Hadamard, T, Z, X etc), Shor’s algorithms and Amplitude Amplification. Below are two introductory textbooks which can start you off in your Quantum Computing learning journey.

Dancing with Qubits.

IBM’s Robert Suitor Explains Quantum Computing from the ground up. To read more about the book you can read our review, or click here to buy it.

Quantum Computing: An Applied Approach

Jack Hidary from Google X explains how Quantum Computing works. We also have reviewed this book here, or you can simply browse the contents of the book.

To read more reviews and summaries from our books section you can visit our dedicated Quantum Book Review page.

Quantum Computing MOOCS

MOOCS stand for massive open online courses and are online courses aimed at massive participation and are often run in conjunction with major universities. There are a number of quantum courses ranging from basic to advanced and offered with platforms such as EdX. The advantages these platforms give is that they can offer more depth and direction to your learning, but sometimes at the expense of immediacy. But well recommended. If you don’t want to commit to a longer course, try the Quantum Course from Brilliant as it’s chunked down into easier segments.

Here are some of the best courses to get started over a weekend in Quantum Computing. We have a fuller page here of more QC courses.

Videos on Quantum Computing

As we all turn to the screen there are some more laid back ways to learn. YouTube is one of them, and there are some resources on one of our pages for learning more about Quantum stuff without lifting yourself off the couch. Amongst them is a great series on Quantum Impact from Microsoft.

Quantum Computing in popular culture

For more tangential references to Quantum Computing, take a look at some movie flicks that are loosely related to Quantum Computing – don’t expect to learn too much though!

Other Quantum Computing Resources

If you are looking for something that doesn’t quite fit, then check out our free quantum resources. Or if you have an idea for how to beat the Corona Virus with a Quantum Computer, check out the free cloud access from D-wave.