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How to get started in quantum computing

March 1, 2021

How to get started in quantum computing

Ashley Montanaro, a quantum-computing researcher at the University of Bristol, UK, runs his quantum programs through Amazon Web Services, a cloud-computing platform that plugs into other firms’ quantum devices. IBM makes a five-qubit machine freely available, but to use the company’s more-powerful machines, research organizations need to be part of its Quantum Network, comprising universities, laboratories and companies. Rigetti Computing in Berkeley, California, which has its own 31-qubit machine, has released a quantum-software development kit called Forest, which includes a Python library called pyQuil. “Quantum computing is essentially matrix vector multiplication — it’s linear algebra underneath the hood,” says Krysta Svore, principal manager of the quantum-computing group at Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington. “Based on the research impact in the field, we will find a way to make that experiment happen,” says Hoffmann, who is based in Munich, Germany. “I would suggest to anyone: start on an emulator,” says Thomas O’Brien, European quantum algorithms and applications lead at Google’s Quantum AI research team, who is based in Munich. But this is a quantum circuit, and the gates modify not the usual binary 1 or 0 bits, but qubits, the fundamental unit of quantum computing.

Article from Nature.com.