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Quantum computing’s reproducibility crisis: Majorana fermions

April 12, 2021

Quantum computing’s reproducibility crisis: Majorana fermions

Journals, funders (including corporations), research labs and universities should demand such open data practices, as they do in clinical trials, genomics, Earth sciences and a handful of other disciplines. In a Nature survey of the ‘reproducibility crisis’ across chemistry, biology, physics, engineering and medical sciences (see Nature 533, 452–454; 2016), selective reporting of results was a top culprit. A case in point: a 2020 Science paper on Fe(Te,Se) reported quantized behaviour of current, which the authors saw in a single vortex, out of 60 assessed10. (When asked about the 2020 paper, a spokesperson for Science said that results and conclusions, including alternative mechanisms to explain the observed quantization, were presented carefully.) Scientists should disclose all data in a repository and comply with sharing standards, such as FAIR (findability, accessibility, interoperability and reusability)15. As someone who works in this area, I’ve become concerned that, after a series of false starts, a significant fraction of the Majorana field is fooling itself. If all papers included full or at least appropriately selected sets of data, quantum physicists could assign correct explanations, Majorana or not.

Article from Nature.com.