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On Gravity—and the Truth of Science

March 2, 2021

On Gravity—and the Truth of Science

Expository writers—at any rate, the good ones—are also searching for truth, but in the human sphere of culture, politics, society and history. There are strongly held personal convictions and considerable bickering in science, too, but eventually incontestable fact, if not absolutely unsettled truth, will emerge. Perhaps, a parallel universe—according to Richard Panek’s The Trouble with Gravity, merely one of potentially 10-500 such universes—generates perturbations in our home universe, which we recognize as gravity. Richard Feynman, who gave us the heuristic diagrams of quantum interactions, famously observed that “Nobody understands quantum mechanics”; the same is true of gravity. Isaac Newton first proposed the idea of gravity as an attraction between two objects—the apocryphal apple—and developed, or discovered, the inverse square law to describe its operative principle. I simply cannot see how gravity can be simultaneously an attractive force, a curvature in spacetime, and a nanohertz wave propagating at the speed of light. Bringing gravity into the family of forces in a single theoretical framework would then produce, according to the cosmologists, a theory of everything.

Article from PJ Media.