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IBM Poured Cold Water on Google’s Claim of Quantum Computing Supremacy

February 19, 2020

IBM Poured Cold Water on Google’s Claim of Quantum Computing Supremacy

Quantum computing could be very disruptive in this space, as Shor’s algorithm could make code-breaking much faster, while quantum-based encryption methods would allow detection of any eavesdroppers. In recent years, we have had many convincing demonstrations that qbits can be created, stored, manipulated and read using a number of futuristic-sounding quantum hardware platforms. Much of the early interest (and funding) in quantum computing was spurred by the possibility of quantum-enabled advances in cryptography and code-breaking. What has lagged quite a bit behind are custom-designed algorithms (computer programs) designed to run on quantum computers and able to take full advantage of possible quantum speed-ups. — Shor’s algorithm for factorization, for example, which has applications in cryptography, and Grover’s algorithm, which might prove useful in database search applications On Oct. 23, 2019, Google published a paper in the journal Nature entitled “Quantum supremacy using a programmable superconducting processor. For the average citizen, the mere fact that a 53-qbit device could beat the world’s fastest supercomputer (containing more than 10,000 multi-core processors) is undoubtedly impressive.

Article from The National Interest Online.