General Technology

Strangeworks, the Texas based Quantum Computing Company refreshes its offering

Strangeworks is perhaps one of the lesser known QC companies. Whilst we haven’t heard from the company in a while we are pleased to note the company has been busy beefing up its software offering. The claim is that Strangeworks can allow users to run quantum code from all major frameworks and in jupyter notebooks. That means you can use Strangework’s software to interact with a variety of platforms and languages such as Cirq, Qiskit, Q# and more.

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General Technology | Quantum Computing Companies

NEC and ParityQC work together to make practical quantum computers

ON February 10, NEC Corporation and ParityQC announced their collaboration in quantum annealing. The former will be the first around the world to implement ParityQC’s quantum annealing software. ParityQC’s Architecture is its new solution to solving optimisation problems on a quantum computer. It also has its own superconducting parametron quantum devices. Using this hardware, quantum […]

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General Technology

Get the latest insight on Quantum Computing from PsiQuantum’s Jeremy O’Brien and Microsoft’s Mark Russinovich

This last week saw MIT’s Future Compute conference with industry luminaries giving their take on what is happening in the world of Computing – not just Quantum Computing. Topics such as edge computing, high performance, quantum computing and of course cloud computing were the main stays of the talks from some of the world’s leading thinkers and technology businesses.

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Fun Stuff | General Technology

Microsoft’s big error in Quantum Computing

In March 2018, Leo Kouwenhoven, a Dutch physicist and Microsoft employee, believed that he found a Majorana fermion, an elusive particle. Microsoft wanted to exploit this particle for quantum computing to rival its competitors, and the company’s quantum computing business development head, Julie Love, promised that a commercial quantum computer will be ready in five years. However, three years later, Kouwenhoven and his team discovered that they did not really find the particle and will retract their original paper published in Nature.

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